Africa: Zanzibar Day 2

This was our “chill the eff out” day.  Which consisted of: eating, beach, pool, eating, drinking, beach, nap, shower, drinks, listening to a local choir sing some Christmas songs and then more eating.

In the morning, I had gone to the resort shop looking for some sort of cold medicine.  They offered me panadadol, which I knew wouldn’t be of any help, but told me that the doctor would be there around 11.  When he arrived I was able to see him quickly and get some meds.  He was an older gentleman from Belgium, who moved to Tanzania about a year and a half ago.  He volunteers his time at the local hospital and then puts in a few hours at the resorts to be able to live there.  He was lovely to me – didn’t charge me for the visit or the meds, which would have been at least $100 USD.   He just asked me that I send him some medical supplies when I get back to America.  So, if any of you have access to medicine or medical supplies, let me know and I’ve got someone you can send it to.  They don’t have much and are always in need of more.

The tide eventually came in and we were able to do some swimming, which was wonderful.  I’ve never been in ocean water that warm.  I thought Samoa was warm, but this was even warmer!  It really was bathwater.  At some point someone compared it to the temperature of tea, so that became the running joke.

We were able to see some of the local sailboats (dao) do their thing once the tide came in.  They are very much reminiscent of the outrigger canoes of the pacific.  The whole time I was in Zanzibar, I felt very much like I was on a pacific island, that just happened to be off the coast of Africa.  The food is similar – breadfruit, mango, banana, papaya, starfruit, citrus, and lots of fish!

There were some great beach chairs down at the beach so we were able to take a lovely nap after our swim.  The resort’s property goes down only so far, and then there was a public beach.  Once you step foot onto the beach, you are fair game for all of the guys selling their wares and trying to make a buck – everything from shells, to getting henna tattoos, your hair braided, a trip on a dao, paintings, jewelry, etc.  We could only take the aggressiveness for so long and eventually came back onto the resort property just because it was easier, and less annoying honestly.  I was trying to imagine walking down Lalomanu beach with someone following me trying to sell me tapa cloth, or a tanoa, and it was hard to picture.  I’m all for haggling and aggressiveness when on the streets of a city, but the beach seems sacred or something.  That being said, that is the way those guys make money, and if it didn’t work, they wouldn’t do it.

We had another great meal that night for dinner.  Afterward, Meagan and Meko went to mass, but Joanna and I stayed back and attempted to watch some stuff on Meko’s computer, but we both crashed out.  The sun had sucked the life out of me, and I had the sunburn to prove it!We had another great meal that night for dinner.  Afterward, Meagan and Meko went to mass, but Joanna and I stayed back and attempted to watch some stuff on Meko’s computer, but we both crashed out.  The sun had sucked the life out of me, and I had the sunburn to prove it!

Pictures below are:

A traditional canoe, my spot on the beach for most of the day (under a tree) and us before dinner on Christmas Eve.

 

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